© Commonwealth Alliance of Youth Workers 2018

About

Jane Melvin

Jane is a Principal Lecturer and Programme Leader for the Undergraduate Work-based Learning Programme at the University of Brighton, UK, which includes a BA (Hons) Youth Work. She is currently Vice-Chair of the Professional Association of Lecturers in Youth and Community Work (TAG PALYCW) in the UK, and is a founder director of the Commonwealth Alliance of Youth WorkAssociations (CAYWA). 

 

With over 25 years experience in both local authority and voluntary sector youth services, Jane came into youth work through outdoor and experiential education. Her research interests now centre on the use of digital technologies as a vehicle for engaging young people in informal and experiential learning contexts, and has just completed a Professional Doctorate in Education(Ed D) examining the nature of digital tools, spaces and places as mediators of youth work practice. She is also an author, contributing chapters to recent youth work and children’s workforce texts, and the Worthing branch leader for the Women’s Equality Party in the UK. 

 

TAG PALYCW

The Professional Association of  Lecturers in Youth and Community Work (TAG:PALYCW) represents youth and community work educators, academics and researchers across the UK, with international links to youth and community work education in countries such as the Republic of Ireland, Australia and across Europe.

 

The Association has its roots in the emergence of youth and community work as a distinct profession in the UK and we often refer to ourselves as TAG, in recognition of the former 'Training Agencies Group' that enabled the development of many youth and community work education programmes in the UK dating back to the 1970's. TAG was superseded by The Professional Association in 2010 but recognition of TAG is retained in the legal title of the Association and is used interchangeably by members.

 

The purpose of the Association is to support research, education and training in youth and community work with a particular concern for higher education, and we represent in excess of 200 educators at over 50 institutions and agencies across the UK. As researchers, educators and academics we draw from different perspectives and approaches across the UK youth and community work sector, but the thing that unites us is the belief in youth and community work as a distinctive way of working with young people and communities.